10.31.14 (Boo!)

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Setting/Plot: “What do I think?”

  • Please explain in a QuickWrite paragraph what you have learned about the story.
    • Focus on setting and plot.
    • Review the information from your group poster (and if needed, your story answers).
  • When you have finished, review the seven themes discussed in class. Explain which theme seems to best fit the story.
  • Review the thematic statements. Which statements seems to be the message of the story?

WORLD STUDIES:

Turned in late work. Worked on 2.5.

Learning Target: “I can identify and use various types of thematic maps.”

Student Talk: What is a vegetation zone? How do plants survive inside different environments?

Read Section 2.5

  • Identify vocabulary: arid, desert, humid continental, vegetation zones
    • Define them as they are described in the reading. (nothing else!)
    • Reflect: What does this word have to do with understanding thematic maps.
  • What plant has adapted to an extreme environment? Describe this vegetation zone using the graphic on p. 32-33 and the climagraph on p. 30-31.
  • What vegetation zone contains no plant life? Use the climagraph on p. 30-31 to describe the highest temperature of this vegetation zone.
  • “Like climate zones, vegetation zones are affected by their location on Earth.” Please explain why northern Africa is mostly desert and desert scrub, with tropical grasslands in the south. Carefully examine the map on p. 33, the graphic on p.32-33 and the global map in the room to help you answer this question. (Work with a partner on this one.)

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Turned in posters–finished or not. Handed in graphic organizers for chapter two.

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10.30.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Finished setting/plot posters for ‘Harrison Bergeron’.

WORLD STUDIES:

Reviewed 2.2-2.4. Reviewed grades. Turned in late work.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Continued working on group paragraph posters. Due tomorrow. No later.

10.28.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Students finished their story discussions and began making a graphic that collects information on settling, plot and characters for the story. This is a group activity and will be used to help them do further analysis on the finding the story’s theme.

WORLD STUDIES:

We discussed 2.4 and turned in the assignments for 2.2, 2.3 and 2.4.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

After doing self-assessments on the progress of our projects, we resumed working on the posters.

10.27.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Students went over the answers to their in-text questions with partners or with their entire groups. We will coalesce this discussion into class information on setting, plot and characters over the next few days.

WORLD STUDIES:

We completed 2.4 (climate zones) from Friday (10.24.14). Tomorrow we will move onto vegetation zones.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

To redirect and assess student progress on the poster projects, I created a two simulated paragraph responses, one for the Olympic Peninsula and the Puget Lowlands. Both regions were next to each other on the white board and indicated some similar characteristics. The paragraphs were highlighted according to location, climate, physical features, vegetation and wildlife. I asked students to discuss with one another how the corresponding characteristics indicated a variation or difference between the two regions. We highlighted each to see how both revealed differences between the regions’ various factors. Students indicated that they understood that their paragraphs were to show the same types of differences from region to region. Then we resumed the project.

10.24.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION

Today we emphasized the skill of analysis, particularly the difference between denotation and connotation. (Ask your student to see if they know the difference.) Questions for the story are to be completed over the weekend and returned on Monday.

WORLD STUDIES:

Learning Target: “I can identify and use various types of thematic maps.”

Student Talk: What is a climate zone? How does location affect climate?

Read Section 2.4

  • Identify vocabulary: climate zones, precipitation, climagraph
    • Define them as they are described in the reading, provide an illustration, list characteristics of the words and words related and NOT related (opposites) to the vocabulary word.
    • Reflect: What does this word have to do with understanding thematic maps.
  • What factors make up the climate in a climate zone?
    • Use the climagraphs to identify the climate (temperature and precipitation) of the marine west coast in October.
  • How does latitude and elevation affect climate?
  • Use the map on p. 31 and the graph on p. 30-31 to identify and describe the climate zones of Australia.

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

The first of class we reviewed what was expected from the presentation project assigned yesterday. After much discussion, the students reassessed and determined that the posters should demonstrate the differences in the characteristics between the seven geographical regions. Then, the students resumed working on their research and paragraphs for the posters.

10.23.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Discussed how to analyze a text, using the in-text questions in the story, for the purposes of finding out the plot, setting and characters in order to determine the theme of the story.

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WORLD STUDIES:

Reviewed what was learned in 2.3. Began 2.4.

Learning Target: “I can identify and use various types of thematic maps.”

Student Talk: What is a climate zone? How does location affect climate?

Read Section 2.4

  • Identify vocabulary: climate zones, precipitation, climagraph
    • Define them as they are described in the reading, provide an illustration, list characteristics of the words and words related and NOT related (opposites) to the vocabulary word.
    • Reflect: What does this word have to do with understanding thematic maps.
  • What factors make up the climate in a climate zone?
    • Use the graphic to identify the climate of the marine west coast in October.
  • How does latitude and elevation affect climate?
    • Use the map to explain how latitude affects the climate of Australia.

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

We are analyzing and synthesizing the information collected from part two (graphic organizer). We are doing this by completing the following group project:

LEARNING TARGET: “I can explain how environmental factors make up the characteristics of Washington state’s 7 geographical regions.”

“The natural environments of Washington state create seven distinct geographic regions. Each region is the result of an interrelationship between location, physical features, landforms, climate, soils, vegetation, and wildlife. The interaction of these factors gives each region its individual character.”

How do the factors of the natural environment combine to give each region a character? Imagine the geographical regions are people. Use the information collected in your graphic organizers to create a character profile of each region’s “personality”. To do this, please complete the following:

  • Where does the region live? (location)
  • What places does the region like to see and visit? (physical features/landforms)
  • What kind of weather does the region enjoy? (climate)
  • What kind of earth does the region live on? (soil)
  • What kind of garden does the region like to grow? (vegetation)
  • What kind of animals does the region like to raise? (wildlife)
  • Review the answers to these questions and use them to write a paragraph that describes the “personality” of this region.

Reflection: “I better understand how environmental factors make up the characteristics of Washington state’s geographical regions because I can ___________________. ”

10.22.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Continued our second read-through of Harrison Bergeron and answering the in-text questions.

WORLD STUDIES:

Finished 2.3 physical features map/reading assignment.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Finished graphic organizer for part two of chapter 2,

10.21.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Finish reading story and discussing preread questions. Tomorrow we will finish the in-text questions.

WORLD STUDIES:

Learning Target: “I can identify and use various types of thematic maps.”

Student talk: What is a physical feature?

Read section 2.3 (maps and graphics included):

  • Identify vocabulary: elevation
    • Define it as described in the reading, provide an illustration, list characteristics of the words, including words related and NOT related (opposites) to the vocabulary word.
    • Reflect: What does this word have to do with understanding thematic maps?
  • What is a landform? Please provide 4 examples from the graphic at the bottom of pages 28-29.
  • What is a body of water? Please provide 4 examples from the map on p. 29
  • Using the map, provide the elevations of the Thar Desert, Deccan Plateau and the Eastern Ghats.

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Continued reading assignment graphic organizer (yesterday’s assignment)

10.20.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Began reading Harrison Bergeron by Kurt Vonnegut Jr.. Students each have a reading packet that they are to NOT lose.

WORLD STUDIES:

Finished vocabulary for 2.2 and completed the questions. Discussed physical and human geography.

Learning Target: “I can identify and use various types of thematic maps.”

Student talk: What is a thematic map?

Read section 2.2:

  • Identify vocabulary: climate, economic activity, landform, physical features, population density, region, vegetation
    • Because the GeoTerms are already defined on page 27, explain the definitions in your own words. Use the in-text definitions on page 26.
    • Reflect: What could these terms possibly have to do with thematic maps?
  • How can thematic maps show physical geography? (see p. 4 for a definition of physical geography.) Use the vocabulary terms associated with physical geography as part of your answer.
  • How can thematic maps show human geography? (see p. 4 for a definition of human geography.) Use the vocabulary terms associated with human geography as part of your answer.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Reviewed the seven factors of the natural environment. Now we are studying the natural environments of the Washington’s geographical regions.

LEARNING TARGET: “I can explain how environmental factors make-up the geographical regions of Washington state.”

Read 50-65. Complete a graphic organizer for EACH of the seven geographical regions. Work with an elbow or face partner.

  • Location
  • Physical Features
  • Landforms
  • Climate
  • Soils
  • Vegetation
  • Wildlife

Reflection: “I better understand how environmental factors make-up the geographical regions of Washington state because I  ___________________. ”