9.29.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Completed our discussion of the 8 content areas of science fiction. Tomorrow we will “test” what they have learned.

WORLD STUDIES:

Learning Target: “I can understand how maps are used to locate relative and absolute location.”

Read section 1.4, including the maps and graphics.

  • Identify vocabulary: parallels of latitude, equator, meridians of longitude, prime meridian, international date line, coordinates
    • Define them as they are described in the reading, provide an illustration, list characteristics of the words and words related and NOT related (opposites) to the vocabulary word.
    • Reflect: What do these words have to do with understanding relative and absolute location?
  1. Working in your groups, complete the map stations around the room.
  2. Use the Cities Around the World map on p. 17 and the handout The Global Grid: Longitude and Latitude.
  3. Follow the directions at each station. Use the map on p. 17 as a reference point. Write your answers on the map handout.

Student talk: In what ways have we met this learning target using the map activity?

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

  1. Learning Target: “I can explain how Washington state formed during Earth’s geological eras.”

Cenozoic Era Website:

    • Imagine that you are creating a website to share what you have learned on the Cenozoic Era.
    • Within this website, you should have one webpage for each of the following: 1) Cenozoic Era (overview) 2) Olympic Peninsula/Willapa Hills, 3) The Cascade Mountains, 4) The Columbia Plateau, 5) The Olympic Mountains, 6) The Palouse Region, and 7) The Cascade Volcanic Chain. That’s 7 pages total!
    • Each page for the 6 geologic regions should contain information such as location, time, geologic processes and their results. In addition, include images illustrating the geologic processes or the region.
    • To prepare, read p. 18-21. Read with a pen/pencil. Use sticky-notes to help you collect needed notes.
    • Except for titles, all text must be written in complete sentences.
    • Use the website/page templates to guide you.
    • Of the 6 geological regions you are presenting on your website, you may use a bubble map styled format for as many as 3 regions.
  • Reflection: What has this project taught me about the learning target?

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9.26.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Continued discussing the 8 content areas of science fiction. We also handed in the second summary from the article. We will discuss the remaining four content areas on Monday.

WORLD STUDIES:

We reviewed yesterday’s map activity. On the backside, we wrote down if we had achieved the learning target (understanding relative and absolute location) and how we had achieved it. This was handed in for five points.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

We completed Thursday’s assignment, which was due at the end of class. Athletic grade checks are today.

9.25.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Due tomorrow is the second summary of the scientific article. We discussed three content areas of science fiction: futuristic settings, futuristic science and technology and artificial intelligence.

WORLD STUDIES:

We handed in the first vocabulary assignment. Everyone who completed the work, regardless of quality, received a participation grade of 5 pts. We discussed areas of concern, such as properly using complete sentences when writing definitions. Next time, it will be graded for quality.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Due today is yesterday’s (9.24.14) assignment. Today we are examining the Mesozoic Era. The assignment is due tomorrow at the end of class.

Learning Target: “I can explain how Washington state formed during Earth’s geological eras.”

READ section: Mesozoic Era (p. 12, 16-17) & Connecting to Geology (p. 16-17)

Four geologic regions were formed during this era: Kootenay Arc, Okanogan sub-continent, Blue Mountains, North Cascades sub-continent. Choose one of the following strategies to chart your understanding of how each of these four geologic regions were formed.

  • Concept Definition Maps (Use complete sentences. You will lose points if you do not.)
  • Complete one for each geologic region
    1. Main concept (title of geologic region)
    2. (1) Categories (What is it?)
    3. (3-4) Properties (time, geological processes, including tectonic plates)
    4. (1-2) Illustrations (What it looks like)
    5. New definition (How did it influence Washington state’s growth?): _________________
  • Scientific Journal Entries (Do not copy from the text. Use your own words to explain.)
    1. You are a scientist. Write a paragraph journal entry for each of the four geologic regions. Explain how each formed. Include the following:
      1. Time period (years)
      2. Important features and details (geological regions, processes, including tectonic plates)
      3. how these added land mass to Washington state.
  • Reflection: How has my project helped me achieve the learning target?

9.24.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Discussed the graphic organizers handed out yesterday. Reviewed yesterday’s assignment. Will finish and redirect on this assignment tomorrow.

WORLD STUDIES:

We finished the vocabulary assignment. We discuss issues with the completed portions tomorrow.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

We discussed yesterday’s assignment, focusing on the graphic organizer, which many students chose to complete. We assessed our understanding. Tomorrow we will hand in late work and move on to the Mesozoic Era in the book.

9.23.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

We returned to the science article from last week. Students were to read and summarize a section that had not analyzed. We are practicing HOW to summarize rather than copy from the article.

WORLD STUDIES:

Finishing the vocabulary from yesterday’s assignment. Tomorrow we begin the map activity.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

Learning Target: “I can explain how Washington state formed during Earth’s geological eras.”

READ section: Paleozoic Era

Complete ONE of the following:

1. Concept Definition Map (Bubble map!)

      1. Main concept (Paleozoic Era)
      2. (1) Category (What type of person/place/thing is it?)
      3. (1-2) Illustrations (What it looks like)
      4. (2-3) Properties (Major events/features)
      5. New definition (How did it influence Washington state’s growth?): _________________

2. Scientific Journal Entry

    1. Play the role of a scientist. Write a 2-3 paragraph journal entry that explains the discoveries you’ve made about the Paleozoic Era (events and major features) and its influence on Washington state’s growing landmass. You may include a small sketch to show what you see.
  • On the backside, draw the line where Washington’s landmass began during the Precambrian Eon. Next, add the events and major features that added to the state’s landmass during the Paleozoic Era. What does the state look like now?
  • Reflection: How has my project helped me achieve the learning target?

9.22.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

We discussed the article on scientific laws and theories and handed in our written summaries.

WORLD STUDIES:

We discussed 1.2 reading assignment and began working on the vocabulary for 1.3.

Learning Target: “I can understand how maps are used to locate relative and absolute location.”

Read section 1.3, including the maps.

  • Identify vocabulary: compass rose, cardinal directions, intermediate directions, map legend, map key, map grid, global grid
    • Define them as they are described in the reading.
    • Reflect: What do these words have to do with understanding relative and absolute location?
  1. Working in your groups, complete the map stations around the room.
  2. Use the Marshall Gold Discovery State Historic Park map on p. 15 and the handout Map Titles and Symbols.
  3. Follow the directions at each station. Use the map on p. 15 as a reference point. Write your answers on the map handout.

Student talk: In what ways have we met this learning target using the map activity?

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY

4th-5th periods: We reviewed Friday’s assignment (9.19.14).

6th-7th periods: We worked to finish late work, especially the assessment regarding uplift, volcanic activity, folding and faulting. With time remaining we reviewed some of Friday’s assignment (9.19.14).

9.19.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

Using the scientific theory or law your group studied, imagine a sci-fi story based on that law. Outline a story with characters and actions based on that scientific law or theory. Imagine what new discoveries or adventures mankind might experience. Let’s see what you can come up with. Hand in what you have by the end of class. Work fast. Remember–it’s an outline.

WORLD STUDIES:

Learning Target: “I can understand how maps are used to locate relative and absolute location.”

Read section 1.2, including the map.

  • Identify vocabulary: absolute location, distortion, map projection, relative location.
    • Define them as they are described in the reading.
    • Reflect: What do these words have to do with understanding relative and absolute location?
  1. What is the main purpose of maps? Use absolute location and relative location to explain your answer.
  2. What is distortion? Why is it a big problem with maps? How is map projection a solution to this problem?

Student talk: In what ways have I met this learning target using 1.1 & 1.2?

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

  1. Learning Target: I can explain how Washington state formed during Earth’s geological eras.”

Student talk: Review your notes from yesterday’s film. (you will come back to them later)

 

Study the handout: Geological Timeline. The first row is sectioned into supereon, eon, era and period; the remaining rows do not have a supereon. (Notice how the last eon of the first row becomes the next row; same with the second row.)

    • Locate the following time periods:
  • Precambrian Eon
  • Hadean Eon
  • Archean Eon
  • Proterozoic Eon
  • Phanerozoic Eon
  • Paleozoic Era
  • Mesozoic Era
  • Cenozoic Era
  • Review your chapter one outline. Which of these timelines will be discussed in chapter one?
  • STUDY the Geological Time Clock (p. 13) Read the legend; side paragraph.
    • On what time does the geological clock begin?
    • Student Talk: What does Ga, Ma, ca and mya mean?
    • Six time periods are represented. Student Talk: Which three are EONS? Which three are ERAS? Which are larger? Are they on the handout?
    • Identify along the time clock the start of
      • humans
      • mammals
      • land plants
      • animals
      • multicellular life
      • eukaryotes
      • prokaryotes

    Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

9.18.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION

Finish yesterday’s reading assignment. Written summaries of assigned section should be finished by the end of class.

WORLD STUDIES

Learning Target: “I can understand how maps are used to locate relative and absolute location.”

Read section 1.2, including the map.

  • Identify vocabulary: absolute location, distortion, map projection, relative location.
    • Define them as they are described in the reading.
    • Reflect: What do these words have to do with understanding relative and absolute location?
  1. What is the main purpose of maps? Use absolute location and relative location to explain your answer.
  2. What is distortion? Why is it a big problem with maps? How is map projection a solution to this problem?

Student talk: In what ways have I met this learning target using 1.1 & 1.2?

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY

Take notes on the film using the questions you wrote down in your journal on Wednesday. (See yesterday’s post)

9.17.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION

Discussed the introduction of the article on Science Laws and Theories. Took notes. Tomorrow, groups will analyze and discuss portions of the article.

Learning target: “I can identify the characteristics of Science Fiction.”

With your group or elbow partner, close-read the introduction and your assigned section. As you do–

  1. Read the headline of the assigned section. In the margins, annotate (note) what you have learned. “I think this section is about ___________________”
  2. Study the graphic-picture. Discuss and explain what the picture is sharing. “This part of the picture shows me ________________.”
  3. Read the article. Circle words you don’t understand.
  4. Underline or highlight sentences or ideas that make sense to you. “This part of the article seems to be saying ____________________.”
  5. Draw boxes around sentences or ideas you do not understand. (Do NOT draw a box around the entire section!)
  6. Based on what we have read, write a brief summary of the main idea. (Do not copy from the article. That is copying. Summarizing means to explain the main point using your own words.)

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I have _______________________.”

WORLD STUDIES:

Completed yesterday’s reading assignment (1.1). This will be discussed tomorrow and we will move onto 1.2.

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY

We finished yesterday’s assessment questions on Mountain Building Processes. We also wrote down the questions that will be answered for tomorrow’s video on Plate Tectonics.

Video: “Colliding Continents”

  1. Identify the process that formed earth out in space: clumping, glumping, or crumping
  2. What type of rock is considered to be a continental nucleus?
  3. What second supercontinent replaced Vaalbara and contained what would become North America?
  4. What was the fourth and largest ever supercontinent?
  5. Before the Alps became mountains, where did the land reside? How did the Eurasian and African plates form them?
  6. Trick Question: Identify the geologic process that created the Grand Canyon: plate tectonics, mountain building processes or erosion.
  7. What natural disasters will be generated by modern day plate movements?

9.16.14

HISTORY OF SCIENCE FICTION:

We discussed attributes of science fiction, such as how they contain laws and theories of science like the speed of light.

The assignment below will be completed in class tomorrow. An article on scientific laws and theories was handed out. The assignment is for students to go home and read the introduction and take notes on what portions are confusing or understandable. (They may of course read the entire document for fun.)

Learning target: “I can identify the characteristics of Science Fiction.”

With your group or elbow partner, close-read the introduction and your assigned section. As you do–

  1. Read the headline of the assigned section. In the margins, annotate (note) what you have learned. “I think this section is about ___________________”
  2. Study the graphic-picture. Discuss and explain what the picture is sharing. “This part of the picture shows me ________________.”
  3. Read the article. Circle words you don’t understand.
  4. Underline or highlight sentences or ideas that make sense to you. “This part of the article seems to be saying ____________________.”
  5. Draw boxes around sentences or ideas you do not understand. (Do NOT draw a box around the entire section!)
  6. Based on what we have read, write a brief summary of the main idea. (Do not copy from the article. That is copying. Summarizing means to explain the main point using your own words.)

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I have _______________________.”

WORLD STUDIES:

We discussed longitude and latitude. Our first reading assignment is…

Learning Target: “I can understand how maps are used to locate relative and absolute location.”

Student talk: What purposes do maps serve?

Read section 1.1:

  1. How did Lewis and Clark explore on their journey to the Pacific Ocean?
  2. Name 2-3 ways today’s cartographers are explorers like Lewis and Clark.

Record your answers in your reading journal for 1.1.

Reflection: “I am meeting the learning target because I did _______________________.”

WASHINGTON STATE HISTORY:

We completed the reading assignment over Mountain Building Processes and Erosion. We looked at examples of–

2
Uplift
ugab
Folding
faults
Faulting

Then we handed in the following:

“What do I know about mountain building processes?”

Draw pictures, use words, phrases or complete sentences to show how Uplift, Volcanic Activity, Folding, & Faulting build mountains.

Please label pictures so Mr. Southern will know what process you are attempting to explain. You may use lined paper or blank printing paper.