5/30/14

US HISTORY:

Period 1, 4:

Reviewed notes from yesterday’s short video on War of 1812 and politics of the 1828 presidential election (14.1).

Watched two short videos on Westward Expansion and discussed the differences between the two:

Period 2, 4: Watched and discuss video on the War of 1812 and took notes on how the federalist and democratic republicans turned into the National Republicans and Democratic parties, respectively.

• Federalists oppose the War of 1812 because they see Britain as an ally. Democratic-Republicans favor war as a means to gain more territory held by Native Americans.

• When the Americans “win” the war, the federalist lose support and die off as a political party. (Don’t worry. From the ashes, the philosophy of the federalists will live on!)

• In the 1824 presidential election, John Quincy Adams, a federalist, defeats war hero Andrew Jackson, who is a democratic-republican.

• Because the name “federalist” is no longer in favor, John Quincy Adams calls himself a democratic-republican.

• In the 1828 presidential race, Andrew Jackson runs against John Quincy’s bid for reelection. By now, supporters of Andrew Jackson called themselves Democrats. They wanted small government, and they opposed trade protection, national banks, and paper money.

• Supporters of John Quincy Adams called themselves National Republicans. They wanted a strong central government that would promote commerce and improve public works: roads, turnpikes, canals, harbors and navigation improvements.

WORLD STUDIES:

Free-day celebration for Smarter Balance Assessment Testing

5/29/14

US HISTORY:

Periods 1, 2 & 4: Watched and discuss video on the War of 1812 and took notes on how the federalist and democratic republicans turned into the National Republicans and Democratic parties, respectively.

• Federalists oppose the War of 1812 because they see Britain as an ally. Democratic-Republicans favor war as a means to gain more territory held by Native Americans.

• When the Americans “win” the war, the federalist lose support and die off as a political party. (Don’t worry. From the ashes, the philosophy of the federalists will live on!)

• In the 1824 presidential election, John Quincy Adams, a federalist, defeats war hero Andrew Jackson, who is a democratic-republican.

• Because the name “federalist” is no longer in favor, John Quincy Adams calls himself a democratic-republican.

• In the 1828 presidential race, Andrew Jackson runs against John Quincy’s bid for reelection. By now, supporters of Andrew Jackson called themselves Democrats. They wanted small government, and they opposed trade protection, national banks, and paper money.

• Supporters of John Quincy Adams called themselves National Republicans. They wanted a strong central government that would promote commerce and improve public works: roads, turnpikes, canals, harbors and navigation improvements.

Period 7: Took the exam and outlined chapter 14.

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period: Finished watching and discussing yesterday’s video

8th period:

Quietly, or with a partner, read sections 9.1-9.2, including the essential question and graphic organizer. Answer the following questions in your own words.

• List several ways the Romeros and Albas families live differently from each other. (With a partner: Predict why you think these two families live different. Record your answer in the journal.)

  • “Spatial inequality…is an unequal distribution of wealth or resources over a geographic area.”(With a partner: Explain what this means using the Romeros and Albas as examples. Record your answer in the journal)

• In what ways did the people of Tenochtitlan enjoy a high standard of living?

• What city replaced Tenochtitlan? What key factor caused this new city to rapidly urbanize? Explain how this urbanization happened.

Reflection: If the learning target is to understand the concept of spatial inequality, what words, phrases or sentences are showing my understanding?

 

5/28/14

US HISTORY:

Periods 1, 2 & 4:

Exam on Federalists vs Democratic-Republicans. Outlined chapter 14.

Period 7:

11 students present. Outlined Chapter 14.

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period:

Watched video and answered questions.

1. Watch the video and read the English subtitles. Write down anything you learn about life as a Mexican farmer.

2. Watch the video again. Now pay closer attention to what is said. Take notes on the following questions:

• What conditions force these farmers to leave their lands and find work in other countries or in the cities?

• What stress is placed upon the family when one of the parents is forced to migrate?

Making Connections: What have you learned in this video that connects to what you learned about urban migration in 9.3?

8th period:

Classroom Pacific Science Center presentation.

 

 

5/27/14

US HISTORY:

Studied for tomorrow’s exam. (2nd period discussed and turned in answers for document A & B).

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period: testing

8th period: Watched video on urban sprawl in Mexico City.

1. Watch the video and take notes only on what you see. Describe the visual images that show the effects of urban sprawl.

2. Watch the video again. Now listen to what is said. Take notes on the following questions:

• What problems occur to water, electricity and phone lines, including traffic and the cost of land, as the city rapidly spreads outward?

• How much waste does Mexico City produce each day?

• Why didn’t the city build up, instead of continuing to build outward?

• How is “redensification” helping to solve this problem?

 

5/23/14

US HISTORY:

Periods 1, 2, 4:

Discussed document B and turned in answers for documents A & B. Began studying for next week’s exam.

Period 7:

Studying for Wednesday’s exam

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period: 

No class. Testing in computer lab

8th period:

Finished outlines for Ch. 9. Began pre-chapter activity:

Think of a city you have read about, or recently visited. In this space provided, draw and label some of its main features and where they are located. You could include buildings, main streets, major landmarks, neighborhoods, and homes.

What are the best characteristics of the city?

What are the worst characteristics of the city?

Did You Know?

Did You Know?

KNOW YOUR HISTORY: Memorial Day was started by former slaves on May, 1, 1865 in Charleston, SC to honor 257 dead Union Soldiers who had been buried in a mass grave in a Confederate prison camp. They dug up the bodies and worked for 2 weeks to give them a proper burial as gratitude for fighting for their freedom. They then held a parade of 10,000 people led by 2,800 Black children where they marched, sang and celebrated.

Thanks to Abstrakt Goldsmith for this nugget of history that most of us never learned in school.

5/22/14

US HISTORY:

Periods 1, 2 & 4:

(7th grade testing) Students finished document B. Document A & B will be discussed tomorrow and handed in.

First Read-through:

Between the two letters, what is the general attitude about Louisiana and Jefferson? (cite evidence)

Close-Read King’s letter:

  • “Since slavery is legal and exists in Louisiana, and the treaty states that we must protect the property of the inhabitants, won’t we be forced to admit the new states as slave states?” How exactly will the admission of Louisiana to the Union promote the spread of slavery?
  • “Doing so will worsen the problem of unequal representation from slave and free states.” How will the spread of slavery affect representation (8.7-8.8) between slave and free states in Congress? (cite evidence)

Make Connections: What similarities can you find between Pickering and Hamilton writings concerning their attitudes about Jefferson? (cite evidence)

 

Periods 7:

Studied for the exam next week.

Study for the Exam. (How?) With a partner, take turns role-playing a federalist and a democratic-republican. Write a dialogue (play), or interview each other, in which you discuss the how and the why of your involvement in each of the following topics:

* Articles of Confederation (8.1)

* Bill of Rights

* Right to vote

* Shays’s Rebellion

* Whiskey Rebellion

* French Revolution

* National Economy

* National Bank

* Alliance with Great Britain & France

* The Louisiana Purchase: slavery & land use

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period:

Part One (9.3):

• What is urban migration? How is the Ortiz family an example of this?

• What struggles do farmers face in Mexico’s countryside?

• Why do many farmers decide to migrate to the city?

Making connections to the reading: Return to the notes you took on the picture. Who do you think lives here? Why are the homes crowded together and made with cardboard, plastic and cinderblocks?

8th period:

Continued presentations.

Others finished the reflective assignment from yesterday. Others worked on the Chapter 9 outline (reading journal).

 

5/21/14

Half-day ‘B’ schedule:

US HISTORY:

4th: Most students were testing. Those not, worked on the yesterday’s reading assignment.

7th: Some students testing. Others discussed Document A & B. Turned in assignment.

WORLD STUDIES:

8th period: Continued presenting and completing presentations. Those who finished early completed a reflective assignment on the past unit.

Looking back on Chapter Five, what have you learned about the positives and negatives of Urban Development? Write a QuickWrite paragraph, or create a T-Chart, that explains this, using examples from past assignments, projects or discussions.

5/20/14

US HISTORY:

(period 1, 2):

Document A Questions:

First Read-through: Do you think Hamilton is in favor or against the purchase of Louisiana? (cite evidence)

Close-Read: How does Hamilton feel about Jefferson’s involvement? (cite evidence)

Close-Read: What is Hamilton’s attitude about the acquisition of New Orleans? (cite evidence) How does Hamilton feel about the rest of the territory? (cite evidence)

Make Connections: Explain the difference in attitude towards New Orleans and the rest of the territory. Review the core values of the federalists to help you cite your evidence.

Document A:

“The purchase of New Orleans is essential to the peace and prosperity of our Western country, and opens a free and valuable market to our commercial states.

This purchase will probably make it seem like Mr. Jefferson is brilliant. Any man, however, who possesses any amount of intelligence, will easily see that the purchase is the result of lucky coincidences and unexpected circumstances and not the result of any wise or thoughtful actions on the part of Jefferson’s administration.

As to the vast region west of the Mississippi, it is a wilderness with numerous tribes of Indians. And when we consider the present territory of the United States, and that not one-sixteenth is yet under occupation, the possibility that this new purchase will be a place of actual settlement seems unlikely.

If our own citizens do eventually settle this new land, it would weaken our country and central government. On the whole, we can honestly say that this purchase is at best extremely problematic.”

–Alexander Hamilton

(period 4, 7):

Finishing Document A from Yesterday.

Beginning Document B today. First Read-through:

Between the two letters, what is the general attitude about Louisiana and Jefferson? (cite evidence)

Close-Read King’s letter:

  • “Since slavery is legal and exists in Louisiana, and the treaty states that we must protect the property of the inhabitants, won’t we be forced to admit the new states as slave states?” How exactly will the admission of Louisiana to the Union promote the spread of slavery?
  • “Doing so will worsen the problem of unequal representation from slave and free states.” How will the spread of slavery affect representation (8.7-8.8) between slave and free states in Congress? (cite evidence)

Make Connections: What similarities can you find between Pickering and Hamilton writings concerning their attitudes about Jefferson? (cite evidence)

Document B:

Rufus King (diplomat-politician) to Timothy Pickering, November 4, 1803

“According to the Constitution, Congress may admit new states. But can the President sign treaties forcing Congress to do so?

According to the Louisiana Treaty, the territory must be formed into states and admitted into the Union. Will Congress be allowed to set any rules for their admission? Since slavery is legal and exists in Louisiana, and the treaty states that we must protect the property of the inhabitants, won’t we be forced to admit the new states as slave states? Doing so will worsen the problem of unequal representation from slave and free states.”

 

Timothy Pickering (diplomat-politician) to Rufus King, March 4, 1804

“I am disgusted with the men who now rule us. The coward at the head [Jefferson] is like a French revolutionary. While he talks about humanity, he enjoys the utter destruction of his opponents. We have too long witnessed his general wickedness—his cruel removals of faithful officers and the substitution of corruption and immorality for honesty.”

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period:

1. Watch the video and take notes only on what you see. Describe the visual images that show the effects of urban sprawl.

2. Watch the video again. Now listen to what is said. Take notes on the following questions:

• What problems occur to water, electricity and phone lines, including traffic and the cost of land, as the city rapidly spreads outward?

• How much waste does Mexico City produce each day?

• Why didn’t the city build up, instead of continuing to build outward?

• How is “redensification” helping to solve this problem?

8th period: Finishing posters and presentations.

5/19/14

US HISTORY:

Smarter Balance testing (1 & 2nd periods)

4th & 7th periods:

Read a letter (document A) from Alexander Hamilton to the Saturday Evening Post entitled “Purchase of Louisiana”. This is an editorial meant to persuade the reading audience to his thinking.

First Read-through: Do you think Hamilton is in favor or against the purchase of Louisiana? (cite evidence)

Close-Read: How does Hamilton feel about Jefferson’s involvement? (cite evidence)

Close-Read: What is Hamilton’s attitude about the acquisition of New Orleans? (cite evidence) How does Hamilton feel about the rest of the territory? (cite evidence)

Make Connections: Explain the difference in attitude towards New Orleans and the rest of the territory. Review the core values of the federalists to help you cite your evidence.

Letter: 

“The purchase of New Orleans is essential to the peace and prosperity of our Western country, and opens a free and valuable market to our commercial states.

This purchase will probably make it seem like Mr. Jefferson is brilliant. Any man, however, who possesses any amount of intelligence, will easily see that the purchase is the result of lucky coincidences and unexpected circumstances and not the result of any wise or thoughtful actions on the part of Jefferson’s administration.

As to the vast region west of the Mississippi, it is a wilderness with numerous tribes of Indians. And when we consider the present territory of the United States, and that not one-sixteenth is yet under occupation, the possibility that this new purchase will be a place of actual settlement seems unlikely.

If our own citizens do eventually settle this new land, it would weaken our country and central government. On the whole, we can honestly say that this purchase is at best extremely problematic.”

–Alexander Hamilton

WORLD STUDIES:

3rd period:

Completed part three of 9.3 reading activity wherein we determined where the neighborhood that we studied was located in Mexico City. Following this did a reflective writing assignment and handed it in.

In a paragraph, explain how you feel–so far– about spatial inequality. Use the farmers you have studied in 9.3 as part of your answer.

If the learning target is to understand the concept of spatial inequality, underline the words, phrases or sentences that show your understanding.

8th period:

Finished posters. Presentations are tomorrow.