10/8/13

US HISTORY:

Students are to convert their research question assignment into an outline for a research paper. (No, they are not going to write such a paper. Not yet.) It is due Thursday.

WRITING RESEARCH QUESTIONS (from Friday)

Suppose you are an archaeologist like Tim Pauketat, and you are researching one of the eight geographical regions as described in 1.5 to 1.12.

Which one of these regions most interests you? Select one.

Next, think of a question you would like to research about this region and the first Americans who lived there.

Example: “For my research question I would like to know how the people of the southwest region survived the intense heat and lack of fresh water.”

Once you have your research question, you must develop a series of FIVE investigative questions to help you answer the research question. For each investigative question, you must explain what tool or tools from an archaeologist’s toolkit you would use to help you answer the investigative question.

Archaeologists’ Tools: Oral Histories, radiocarbon dating, artifacts & witnesses.

Example: “How did the people conserve water?” The tools I will use are oral histories and artifacts.

Research Paper Outline: (Today’s assignment)

Introduction: What is this? What is its function? (Main research question goes here)

• Support: What is this? What is its function? (one of the five investigative questions goes here)

• Support: What is this? What is its function? (one of the five investigative questions goes here)

• Support: What is this? What is its function? (one of the five investigative questions goes here)

Conclusion: What is this? What is its function? (We restate the main idea, supporting points and we exit with a final thought.)

WORLD STUDIES:

We discussed the video notes from yesterday and discussed concepts of the earth’s tilt and how it helps create seasons. The notes were handed in along with the reading facts for section 1.7. We then began our map activity on the seasons.